Viewing entries tagged
Blood Pressure

Did you spend 10 minutes with your family listing positive experiences from your day today?

Did you spend 10 minutes with your family listing positive experiences from your day today?

By sharing in the accomplishments of others, we all benefit by feeling supported and empowered.  Our relationships are the backbone of our success. 

Research out of Miami recently demonstrated that in 10 weeks, those who wrote about gratitude were more optimistic and felt better about their lives compared to the group that journaled about things that irritated them or had no instruction. However, the group that expressed gratitude also had fewer visits to physicians.

Did you spend 15 minutes planning your tasks for the day?

Did you spend 15 minutes planning your tasks for the day?

By taking the time to plan your day in advance, you can relieve much of the stress that comes from feeling unprepared and overwhelmed. Take a few minutes each morning to answer the following questions:

  1. What do I want to accomplish today and what is the relative priority of each task?
  2. How much time will it take to complete each task and what time of day do I need to start each task to ensure I complete it on time?

Once you've answered these questions, take 5 minutes to write down your plan for the day. The plan should show each task in order and when you need to complete it by. Then, go about completing your tasks one at a time. Avoid starting the next task until the one you are working on is completed. 

Keep in mind that everyone's plan is flexible. The unforeseen or the urgent need of a friend, spouse, child or supervisor may require you to re-assess your daily plan. But, when new tasks move onto your list, go through the steps above and your day will remain manageable and productive.

Consider making reminders/notes on your phone or computer or even an audio reminder to keep you on task and focused. Be proactive in executing your tasks as well; turn off distractions like social media, TV etc and create a “Do not disturb: I’m being productive” sign if necessary. 

Did you spend 10 minutes meditating today?

Did you spend 10 minutes meditating today?

Is the glass half full or half empty? The answer will depend on how you choose to view your life. Our ability to think critically and to see and then solve problems is a trait that makes us highly productive. However, this critical perspective can often become a habit of focusing on only areas that are not "right". As a result, we can start to see only those things that need fixing and lose sight of all that is going well. Because your outlook will have the greatest impact on your health and daily well-being, it is important to maintain a balanced perspective on your day. By taking a few minutes each day to identify what went right and experience moments of gratitude, you will feel a greater sense of accomplishment and have a more positive outlook.

Research out of Miami recently demonstrated that in 10 weeks, those who wrote about gratitude were more optimistic and felt better about their lives compared to the group that journaled about things that irritated them or had no instruction. However, the group that expressed gratitude also had fewer visits to physicians.

Did you take a lunch break today away from your work environment?

Did you take a lunch break today away from your work environment?

Don't ignore that noon whistle. Believe it or not, taking your lunch break can cut your daily stress levels in half. We all build up stress throughout our day but how much stress we build up depends on how often we stop to "de-stress". That is what taking your lunch break is all about- taking 15 minutes to unwind and relax your mind. So get out from behind your desk and make an appointment to do lunch for your health.

The body is better able to digest and absorb what you are consuming when you are in a de-­stressed state. Make the most of your break and meal by taking time away from your work.

Consider creating a “booster break” versus a health­ compromising break.

Strength or stretching exercises, yoga, tai chi, fruit and vegetable snacks, or guided meditation can be a great way to use part of your lunch break or utilize a quick 15 minute session.

Did you drink 8 ounces of water within one hour of waking and three hours of going to bed?

Did you drink 8 ounces of water within one hour of waking and three hours of going to bed?

Water is the most important liquid in any diet. It is one of your body’s most essential nutrients. 

On average, your body contains about 10-12 gallons of water, and it's essential for your cells to keep functioning.

The safest way to ensure you're getting enough water, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, is to drink at least eight 8 ounce glasses (or 64 fluid ounces) of water per day. 

Wondering if you are drinking enough fluid? Besides feeling thirsty you can also check your urine. If your urine is pale or almost colorless, you are drinking enough. 

Often, thirst is mistaken for hunger, so you can avoid overeating, by simply staying hydrated.

Try drinking mostly water and fluids with no or few calories. Keep bottled water in your car and a large pitcher in your refrigerator. Carry a water bottle with you at all times or leave a cup on your desk as a visual reminder. 

A great way to begin your journey to eight glasses a day is to drink one glass in the morning when you get up, and another after dinner, before bed. 

This method will not only increase your consumption of water, it will remind you to end eating for the night before you settle in for much needed rest. 

So, drink to your health!

Were you able to resolve a stressful situation by taking positive action?

Were you able to resolve a stressful situation by taking positive action?

Effectively managing stress takes practice, just like anything else. This Deed asks you to identify a single source of stress in your life and then work to resolve it. Start with a stressor that is relatively small and that you can find resolution on. Once you've positively resolved one stressor, you can gain practice and tackle the next one.

Quit plan, Reasons to Quit, Share Quit Plan, Identify Support

Quit plan, Reasons to Quit, Share Quit Plan, Identify Support

Developing a plan for quitting smoking is vital for success in eliminating your dependence on nicotine. An effective plan will include the date you will have fully quit smoking, the behavior steps you will take between now and that date to support your goal and a measured and timed approach to reducing tobacco usage.

Studies have shown that emotional support (social support) has an association to quitting smoking. Support from others in your journey to quit smoking will contribute to your confidence and success in quitting. It's important to surround yourself with individuals who will celebrate your successes (large and small), be patient and positive and stick around for the long haul.

Most of us know the top reasons for quitting smoking: you'll live longer and decrease your risk for myriad of cancers; you'll save money; you'll be protecting your family and friends who are exposed to your smoke.  With these reasons in mind, have you identified and written down YOUR reasons for quitting smoking today? Would you like to spend the money you would have spent on cigarettes on a vacation with your wife? Would you like to get off medications for conditions exasperated by smoking? Can you imagine the increase in the pleasures in your life when you quit? 

Set your goal clearly and share your goal and date to quit with others. Avoid setting a quit date at a high-stress time like the Holidays or during a large project at work. Reward yourself each time you reach a goal and allow your support system to celebrate your successes with you.

Did you reduce your use of tobacco products today?

Did you reduce your use of tobacco products today?

Just for today? One day at a time. 

How many doses of tobacco products did you consume today? 

This intention is designed as the first step in reducing use of tobacco products. By taking a daily inventory of tobacco usage, you are then able to set targets for reducing tobacco consumption. There is no other requirement here except to record the number of doses used each day. Often times just objective awareness of tobacco usage will prompt an intrinsic motivation to cut back.